How Do Children Learn To Reconcile Faith And Science?

How Do Children Learn To Reconcile Faith And Science?

It feels often like society is continually at the forefront of all sorts of problems, from biology and vaccination to euthanasia and religion and unable to participate in constructive debates through political divisions.

Thus education must feed children as future people, who are able to hold constructive talks through these barriers of views and discipline, in order to grow the next generation.

We also have big problems. But beyond the philosophical questions regarding the existence and the meaning of life, there are more practical issues that people and leaders will need to take decisions – both now and in the future. How are we to respond to climate change? Can government quarantine people to prevent disease spread? Will terminally ill children’s euthanasia be permitted?

Science as well as ethics, philosophy and religion will guide answers to questions like these. Yet how do we use a variety of various-and sometimes conflicting-sources to make a coherent argument? And how can we also improve the skill of children? Kids are the future, after all.

How To Discuss

First of all, children need to understand what an argument is and what a good argument they’re learning looks like. Simply stated, an argument is a claim or collection of arguments based on facts and premises, while a successful case is based on clear reasons and proof specific to the claim. But what difference have these claims in terms of studying science and religious education (RE) in school?

Over the past 20 years, research has been conducted on teaching and learning claims over sciences. To help it were developed academic textbooks and realistic teaching tools.

Nevertheless, though RE Curriculum papers also mention the need to create well-founded arguments for students, far less work has been done and fewer tools available to teach and learn arguments.

An valid explanation is considered a distinguishing factor between arguments in various fields. In the case of RE arguments, the reasons may be less specified, and more evidence-based than the sciences, especially if the emphasis is not on convincing arguments but on providing a safe space for voicing beliefs and respect for diversity.

And how do we make sure that children who study the two fields will disagree more directly with each other? In partnership with academic scholars, Oxford’s Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project unites the skills of working science and RE teachers. The project examines possible cross-curricular solutions through these areas and provides resources to facilitate argument and reasoning in schools.

How Do We Have Stronger Arguments?

Our project team believes that there are at least three valid reasons for teaching arguments and logic through curricula.

Second, the subject groups can learn from each other valuable lessons. Science teachers should draw on the expertise of teachers who are integral to the conversation, debate and dialogue. On the other hand, the use of the well known methods and framework to teach logical arguments would be useful for RE teachers. They may also rely on the experience of science teachers to discuss scientific ideas and worldviews in ER.

Second, cross-curricular education may help to improve a student’s ability to distinguish the difference between those based on scientific facts and those based more on faith and religion for a variety of issues that may be centered on either science or religious reasons – for example, abortion, end of life decisions, creation. Their capacity to benefit about other world views could be improved too.

Second, cross-curricular education may help to improve a student’s ability to distinguish the difference between those based on scientific facts and those based more on faith and religion for a variety of issues that may be centered on either science or religious reasons – for example, abortion, end of life decisions, creation. Their capacity to benefit about other world views could be improved too.

Innovation

It is not possible to establish this cross-curricular partnership in schools in one way. In reality, we have creative teachers who work inside their busy and sometimes different schools. They are often able to find approaches.

For example, in its separate subject lessons, a RE teacher and a science teacher discuss the same question: Why do we deal with climate change? The students are asked to construct arguments by means of knowledge gained from both disciplines, before integrating these separate arguments between religion and science in order to provide a persuasive and logical response to both disciplines.